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TOP Tips To Overcome An Interview


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Old 12-14-2008, 02:36 PM
hrmanager
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Default TOP Tips To Overcome An Interview

TYPICAL QUESTIONS THAT AN INTERVIEWER WOULD ASK

1.Tell me about yourself
The most often asked question in interviews. You need to have a short statement prepared in your mind. Be careful that it does not sound rehearsed. Limit it to work/Study-related items unless instructed otherwise. Talk about things you have done well at your college and how you wanted to perform in the first job.

2. Why Should We Employ You?
For this question, your answer should list out strengths that you feel are relevant to the job. Given below are some answers which could help you with your answers. However, structure them to suit your requirements.

I have good co-ordination s****s
Good analytical s****s
I can persuade people to see my point of view, and get the work done
My greatest asset is my ability to motivate people
Even during emergencies, I do not loose my cool
I have good entrepreneurial s****s
I have consistently met my deadlines and targets
Can say no to people when required to do so!
I am very co-operative with my sub-ordinates, and would like to see them grow
I am a good team player
I am very flexible, and have the ability to work hard under difficult work conditions
I have the experience and knowledge relevant to this job (Here, give appropriate details and examples)

3. Do You Have Offers From Other Companies ?
This is of course a difficult question to answer. Obviously, you must have applied to other companies if you are looking for a job or would have some offers from other companies already. Therefore, do not lie that you have not. However, you are on thin ice here! The interviewer could be checking your honesty. On the other hand, he/she may also be trying to find out how focused you are - are you applying randomly, or is there a well-planned strategy?
Whatever your answer, it should match your career goals.

4. What Salary Are You Expecting?
Try not to get into salary details early in the interview. If pressed, you could say that it all depends on the job, and would like to talk about it after a job offer. Say this in a convincing tone. In case you are asked this question in your latter interviews, give a direct answer. Do not sound apologetic while quoting the figure you have in mind.


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SALARY EXPECTATIONS :

1. How much do you expect?
If you have done your homework, you would know how much other people in similar jobs are paid. Quote the range upfront.
2. How much do you think you are worth?
Work out how much you should be paid, given the market value of the job and your s****s. If you can bring some extra s****s to the table, do not hesitate to ask for more than the market value.

3. What kind of a culture are you comfortable with?
It is better to be frank about your preferences. Your interviewer will get a clear idea about your expectations.

4. Which is more important to you-salary, perks or growth opportunities?
This one will reveal the real you. So be sure what you are going to say. Above all, be true to yourself. If you think this is a negotiation move, then say clearly that you will never sell yourself short.

5. What do you know about our company?
Do not give your opinions about the company. Stick to reported facts that you have gathered from newspapers and so on. Talk about the product portfolio, size, income, and market perceptions of the company. Also it is better to refer details about each company before going for the interview from Freshersworld.com or PlacementWeek.com

6. Why should we choose you over someone else?
Talk clearly about problems that you have solved in your College/Project Team and highlight the quality required.

6. Your qualifications are excellent, but you may be overqualified for the position we have to offer?
Point out that more experience can never be a drawback. If you are multi-s****ed, then highlight the fact that a company on the fast-track needs multi-s****ed people. It needs people within different departments to work together. Also emphasise that the company's future growth will be an exponential function of your experience.


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QUESTIONS YOU SHOULD ASK :

Interviewers usually round off by giving you an opportunity to ask questions. Treat it like a welcome opportunity.
You could ask questions like.
a) Tell me about your company.
b) Now that I have outlined my career goals, do you think you can offer me the opportunities I need?
c) What kind of training and learning can I expect in your company?
d) Describe the work culture and the management style of your company?
e) What is the long-term vision of your company?

As a fresher, current position and status can impact the way you are interviewed. Fresh Out of College

The basis on which you will be judged is your academic background, family background, and interests.
If looking for your first job, ensure that your previous experience, even if it is part-time, is noticed.
Mention projects or responsibilities you may have undertaken. This will indicate your area of aptitude.
You should be willing to put in regular hours, in line with the company's policies. The interviewer needs to know whether you can be punctual and put in full-time work.
In case you have applied for the post of management trainee, you should display an ability to adapt, and indicate all-round interests. Moreover, you should have good interpersonal s****s.
You should be enthusiastic to learn, and show commitment towards the organization, as the company will be spending a lot on your training.


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Bring with you :
a) Copies of your resumes
b) References and letters of recommendations.

First Impressions :
There is a common saying that minds are made up within the first 5 minutes of an interview. So keep in mind these important first impression indicators. Walk in the door as if you already work there, carry yourself as though you feel perfectly comfortable with the situation. Arrive on time or a little early. In the waiting area, politely tell the receptionist who you are meeting and in a friendly way, ask where you should sit. Take slow, deep breaths to help you remain calm and focused. When introduced to the interviewer, have a firm, but not painful, handshake. Smile. Have good posture when sitting or standing. Introduce yourself in a relaxed, confident manner. Have a well-groomed, professional appearance. Project a feeling of confidence. Bring extra copies of your resume, some thing to write on and something to write with.




Great interviews arise from careful groundwork. You can ace your next interview if you:
  1. Enter into a state of relaxed concentration. This is the state from which great basketball players or Olympic skaters operate. You'll need to quiet the negative self chatter in your head through meditation or visualization prior to sitting down in the meeting. You'll focus on the present moment and will be less apt to experience lapses in concentration, nervousness, self-doubt and self-condemnation.

  2. Act spontaneous, but be well prepared. Be your authentic self, professional yet real. Engage in true conversation with your interviewer, resting on the preparation you did prior to coming to the meeting. Conduct several trial runs with another person simulating the interview before it actually occurs. It's the same as anticipating the questions you'll be asked on a final exam.

  3. Set goals for the interview. It is your job to leave the meeting feeling secure that the interviewer knows as much as he or she possibly can about your s****s, abilities, experience and achievements. If you sense there are misconceptions, clear them up before leaving. If the interviewer doesn't get around to asking you important questions, pose them yourself (diplomatically) and answer them. Don't leave the meeting without getting your own questions answered so that you have a clear idea of what you would be getting yourself into. If possible, try to get further interviews, especially with other key players.

  4. Know the question behind the question. Ultimately, every question boils down to, "Why should we hire you?" Be sure you answer that completely. If there is a question about your meeting deadlines, consider whether the interviewer is probing delicately about your personal life, careful not to ask you whether your family responsibilities will interfere with your work. Find away to address fears if you sense they are present.

  5. Follow up with an effective "thank you" letter. Don't write this letter lightly. It is another opportunity to market yourself. Find some areas discussed in the meeting and expand upon them in your letter. Writing a letter after a meeting is a very minimum. Standing out among the other candidates will occur if you thoughtfully consider this follow up letter as an additional interview in which you get to do all the talking. Propose useful ideas that demonstrate your added value to the team.

  6. Consider the interviewer's agenda. Much is on the shoulders of the interviewer. He or she has the responsibility of hiring the right candidate. Your ability to do the job will need to be justified. "Are there additional pluses here?" "Will this person fit the culture of this organization?" These as well as other questions will be heavily on the interviewer's mind. Find ways to demonstrate your qualities above and beyond just doing the job.

  7. Expect to answer the question, "Tell me about yourself." This is a pet question of prepared and even unprepared interviewers. Everything you include should answer the question, "Why should we hire you?" Carefully prepare your answer to include examples of achievements from your work life that closely match the elements of the job before you. Obviously, you'll want to know as much about the job description as you can before you respond to the question.

  8. Watch those nonverbal clues. Experts estimate that words express only 30% to 35% of what people actually communicate; facial expressions and body movements and actions convey the rest. Make and keep eye contact. Walk and sit with a confident air. Lean toward an interviewer to show interest and enthusiasm. Speak with a well-modulated voice that supports appropriate excitement for the opportunity before you.

  9. Be smart about money questions. Don't fall into the trap of telling the interviewer your financial expectations. You may be asking for too little or too much money and in each case ruin your chances of being offered the job. Instead, ask what salary range the job falls in. Attempt to postpone a money discussion until you have a better understanding of the scope of responsibilities of the job.
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